Touring Shows

CIVIL RIGHTS LEGACY TOUR

For more than 10 years, Tacoma Arts Live has presented original touring productions that honor the legacy of civil rights leaders and encourage civic responsibility among young learners. These touring shows have reached over 150,000 youth at schools throughout Pierce, King, South Kitsap, and Thurston Counties. This series of theatrical works explore the on-going story of civil rights through the experiences of diverse Americans, such as the stories of Martin Luther King Jr and Ruby Bridges, immigration rights, and Japanese American internment during WWII. Bringing to life both history and civics concepts, each play is accompanied by study guides for K-12 students. All productions fulfill the requirements for the January Good Citizen/Temperance recognition.

GUIDED BY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING’S QUOTE:

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

2023-24 CIVIL RIGHTS LEGACY TOUR Production:

WHERE BLOOMING FLOWERS MEET THE SKY

By Darryin B. Cunningham

Civil Rights Legacy Tour

 

This year’s NEW show follows the story of Zhuli, a young artist writing a new book of poetry. On her artistic journey she is visited by three prominent ancestors from the 1960s civil rights era. Each one gives her a piece of wisdom from their experience, helping her to find her voice.

Tour Dates: January 10 – 31, 2024

Single Tour Assembly: $1,200
Two Assemblies at one School: $1,300

Partnering Schools Assembly: $850 each – Partner with another school to host one assembly at each school on the same day.

To book your assembly for the 23-24 school year, please contact education@tacomaartslive.org.

Click here for the public performance

Curriculum resources

VIRTUAL BOOKING

Nihonjin face

By Janet Hayakawa and Tere Martinez

Nihonjin Face

 

Virtual Booking: $425 – Nihonjin Face by Janet Hayakawa and Tere Martinez

As World War II begins, ten-year-old Tomiko and her family must leave their home in Tacoma’s Nihonmachi (Japan Town), along with 110,000 other Japanese Americans. During her years of incarceration, Tomiko learns the impact of racial discrimination and develops empathy for others facing civil rights challenges – eventually joining Dr. Martin Luther King’s efforts. Later in life, she shares her experiences with her grandson, who is also navigating the complexities of racial identity in the America of today.

Curriculum resources

SPONSOR:

Annie Wright Schools
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